London is your Oyster

You just arrived. The city is boiling. Beyonce just left town. Music festivals are kicking off and revelling pub visitors stand outdoors, with a pint glass in their hands. It’s dry and hot weather. No rain as you might have expected. There is a strong wind and seagulls are seen hovering the sky. You just missed the Chelsea Garden Show and, as I said, Beyonce playing a massive show, but there is still time for the World Cup. On telly, in a pub. I’m telling you, the city is eerie during football matches, with cheerful screams in intervals. You arrived during a busy summer.

To discover the city, get yourself familiar with the local transport. Go to the nearest tube station to get an Oyster card. It is five GBP deposit to obtain this electronic entry ticket to trains, busses and ferries, without a need for registration. London is your oyster with that card. Since it’s so hot I will share with you the perfect start of a little tour around town and will help you orientate.

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Oyster Transportation Card, London

Near the station London Bridge, right on the bank of River Thames, sits a massive former Powerstation hosting one of the most important Museums of the world Tate Modern. You can cross various bridges to get there. You will see the tower from afar and that’s where the ferry stops. The Thames Clippers run along the River and you can use your Oyster.
Hopping on at Bankside pier you can travel east to Canary Wharf, passing a gigantic warship by Tower Bridge. The view opens onto an Island, it’ s Canary Wharf, a financial district and an architectural Dystopia in one. While the sun is blazing, reflective surfaces bounce the light off the many sky scrapers populating this plot of land in front of you. They are standing bravely by the river. On the island News appear in electronic lettering, characters and numbers run along walls. Future is here when you take another unusual transport called the DLR. The three letters stand for Docklands Light Railservice and by light it possibly means to explain that there is no driver on this type of train. Only an operator who might be up for a chat, do join him in the front carriage. The front seat flat window view will allow you to understand the rhythm of urban regeneration and he might be able to tell you a few stories. Upon arrival at Tower Hill I encourage you to take a walk past an infamous building you might have heard of from the News. On 20 Fenchurch Street thrones the ‘Walkie- Talkie’, in the middle of another financial district home to London. When it’s as hot as today the sunlight is reflected on its surface in a special way. It diverts at an angle that upgrades a simple sunbeam to pristine heat. The ‘Walkie Talkie’ earned notoriety by melting cars parked nearby, you are invited to inspect today’s damage on your way to the Barbican Centre. Another destination making London so special.

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